In this Violin Podcast interview, Eric Mrugala talks to violinist Christian Hebel on the Violin Podcast. Christian Hebel is a violinist, and music producer who works in in Los Angeles and New York. In this video, we also talk about his journey from college to becoming a professional violinist, how he got his big break working with famous artists, and tour with them around the world.

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to play the violin?

Look no further!

“Getting Started On The Violin” written by Eric Mrugala was written for the person who wants to play the violin but doesn’t know where to start.

Here are some of the things that the E-book addresses:

  • Looking for a violin teacher
  • Finding the the right violin
  • What to look for when choosing an instrument
  • Accessories
  • Goal Setting
  • Starting Your Journey

Grab a copy of this E-book on Amazon.

Sheetmusicplus.com is having a Beethoven Sale for piano/violin sonatas

Beethoven Sonatas for Piano and Violin – Volume 1 – Henle Verlag
Original Price: $45.95
Sale Price: $36.76 (plus taxes and fees)

look inside Sonatas for Piano and Violin – Volume I Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827). Edited by Sieghard Brandenburg. Sheet Music. Paperbound. Henle Music Folios. Urtext edition-paper bound. Classical Period. Collection and set of performance parts (softcover). With bowings and fingerings. 159 pages. G. Henle #HN7. Published by G. Henle (HL.51480007).

Beethoven Sonatas for Piano and Violin – Volume 2 – Henle Verlag
Original Price: $49.95
Sale Price: $39.96 (plus taxes and fees)

look inside Sonatas for Piano and Violin, Volume II Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827). Edited by Sieghard Brandenburg. Sheet Music. Paperbound. Henle Music Folios. Urtext edition-paper bound. Classical Period. Collection and set of performance parts (softcover). With introductory text, bowings and fingerings. 254 pages. G. Henle #HN8. Published by G. Henle (HL.51480008).

Beethoven Sonata for Piano and Violin op. 24 (Spring Sonata)
Original Price: $17.95
Sale Price: $14.36 (plus taxes and fees)

look inside Sonata for Piano and Violin F major op. 24 (Spring sonata) Violin and Piano. Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827). Edited by Sieghard Brandenburg. Sheet Music. Paperbound. Henle Music Folios. Urtext edition-paper bound. Classical Period. Single piece and set of performance parts (softcover). With bowings and fingerings. 37 pages. G. Henle #HN162. Published by G. Henle (HL.51480162).

Beethoven Sonata for Piano and violin op. 47 (Kreutzer Sonata)
Original Price: $26.95
Sale Price: $21.56 (plus taxes and fees)

look inside Sonata for Piano and Violin in A major Op. 47 (“Kreutzer-Sonata”) Violin and Piano. Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827). Edited by Sieghard Brandenburg. Sheet Music. Paperbound. Henle Music Folios. With marked and unmarked string parts. Classical. Softcover. 81 pages. G. Henle #HN714. Published by G. Henle (HL.51480714).

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RUN THE OTHER WAY!

No, no, no, I’m kidding.

This is a rather interesting topic that gets some attention in the teaching world. If you’re a private music teacher, sooner or later you’re going to have a student’s parent email you regarding their development.

Here’s the thing, the email they send gives you suggestions for what to teach their daughter. Especially if it’s a piece of music that is out of the student’s reach at the moment.

This can be complicated for a few reasons.

Of course you want your student to succeed but you know deep down they’re not ready for the pieces their parents suggested due to certain violin technique restraints.

So, what do you do?

Since this scenario happened to me recently, I’d like to add my opinion to the conversation if I may.

The first thing to do is to reply to the parents. They’re investing in their child’s education and only want the best for them. At the end of the day, they’re taking lessons with YOU and they trust YOUR advice.

If you like talking with parents face to face, then you can say something along the lines of, “I think these are great ideas, let me think about it and get back to you within the week.” This is a simple way of giving yourself enough time to process this information and in a polite manner. The worst thing you can do is respond when you’re having a bad day or after a bad lesson with your student if didn’t go so well.

Second, offer suggestions that go within the student’s strengths. Oftentimes teachers make the mistake of assigning a new piece that’s too difficult. It will be a very, very long journey for the two of you getting through the piece together if you choose something that’s too hard for your violin student.

ViolinPodcast.com is happy to announce a collaboration with its main contributor, Eric Mrugala, on his upcoming ebook, “Getting Started On The Violin”

“Getting Started On The Violin” is a short ebook written for the new beginner student in mind. You’ll learn how to find a good teacher in your area, what to look for when you got a string shop, and how to get the most out of your violin. Now available for pre-order on Amazon.

Over the years, U.S. airlines have been stringy on bringing your instrument on board. IN the past, I was able tog et on board with my violin with ease. Even though the FAA has made rules about you being able to fly with your violin, sometimes there’s my no guarantee that your violin will make it into the overhead bin. Here are a few tips to make your traveling less painful:

1) Be careful buying Basic Economy

In the past, I would’ve advised that you purchase the cheapest ticket and politely ask the associate at the front desk to get you on the plane sooner. These days, airlines have made it convenient for the average customer to get a great price.

Well, you’re not their average customer, are you?

Usually, these Basic Economy tickets have many restrictions when you get on board like early boarding and selecting your seat.

For any instrumentalist flying, these are the two most important things you need to have control over. If you have early boarding, then you have early access to the overhead bins and you’ll have an easier flight experience.

2) Check the airplane model

You have heard that Boeing was in the news with their 737-MAX planes. This plane had a lot more storage space in the overhead bins. But, because of the recent crashes within the last year all the 737-MAX planes that these airlines ordered are now grounded indefinitely. When you purchase tickets, check the plane model of the time you’re flying. Not all planes have the same amount of storage space.

3) Be nice to the crew

Imagine, you got the cheapest ticket available and it’s six in the morning. The worker at the front desk announces the flight is full and says this dreadful line, “We are asking for volunteers to check in their carry on bag and the baggage price will be waived by doing so.” This is the moment where you go up to the front desk right away and be the nicest passenger on the planet and ask if there is any way you can get on an earlier boarding group. Usually they allow you to do so.

Bonus: Airline Credit Cards

I don’t typically recommend airline credit cards, but if you live in an area where there’s a small airport and have few airlines to choose from, then it might not be a bad idea to get a credit card associated with your preferred airline. A lot of these credit cards have perks that not every customer gets like early boarding, and your 1st checked bag free. I would get one for the early boarding perk.